When is the next where

Couldnt resist this posting on Mapping Hacks. “When is the next where” ought to be a meme but apparently its not. Some ideas about why. What does it mean? asks MH, because “I’m interested in communicating with that subset of a subset of geeks who actually care about both time and space.” Its not a…

Fish come ashore – again

Technovelgy reports that a digital artist has created a robot fishbowl that allows fish to move on land. Seth Weiners Terranaut project trains a video camera on fish swimming in a goldfish bowl (which is mounted on a sort of trolley). The trolley then moves in the direction in which the fish swim. Technovelgy says…

Yes, but can it detect cannabis?

According tot he New Scientist Dutch police use surveillance cameras with microphones to estimate anger levels and anticipate violence. The NS report says: “Microphones attached to the cameras feed the sound signals to software that can detect voices that are aggressive in tone. “Aggressive people tend to tense their larynx, and the sound made by…

Not so anomalous after all?

Good Math, Bad Math reports that the Princeton Engineering Anomalies Research Group (PEAR) has lost its funding. GMBM is also very critical of their stats and calls their results fakes. Oh dear. I find myself in a difficulty here. GMBM simply asserts that: “The problem with PEAR was that they were sure that their experiments…

The first computer game

You can download from here a simulation of the worlds first computer game. A version of noughts and crosses, this was created on the EDSAC comuter in Cambridge, which first ran in May 1949 and was probably the first stored-programme computer to actually perform regular work. As there was only one machine which could run…

Google and medical diagnosis

According to the Daily Mail, tests have shown that researchers can make successful diagnoses of difficult conditions, using a Google serach based on symptoms. Once junior doctor commented that a rare illness popped right out of a search. The accuracy rate (measured by comparing the results with correct diagnosis in 26 difficult cases) was 58%.…

Massive databases? Not quite yet

There are many reports about the increased use of massive databases, but Mapping Hacks reports on one reason why they may be slower to take off: competitive proprietary information. Theres a ridiculous wrangle in the UK between the Ordinance Survey and everyone else. The OS owns all the official address and geolocation data in the…