Popularising and marketing science: the dilemma

Ive been worried about the use of simulation in schoolsand a posting in Brainethics suggests that cognitive neuroscientists or psychologists have similar issues. Raises the broader issue of how you market a complex and still limited tool. Brainethics refers to a paper in Nature which describes various commerical products such as BrainGym (“Learn ANYTHING faster…

Birds and bots: simulation and syntax

John Hawks weblog has a piece on starling syntax, which seemed relevant to my recent posting on simulations by birds, and recent reading on bots. Hawks discusses recent work on bird song and experiments to see if birds can use sound to communicate in a linguistic sense. Not yet proven, seems to be his verdict.…

Simulating. not stimulating.

A report from Channel TV in Guernsey about the simulation I ran there on Wednesday quotes me as saying “Were stimulating an incident and we will then make sure the response follows the appropriate procedures”. A subtle but important mis-spelling. The BBC put it more accurately: “Regular exercises are held to test co-operation and the…

Ship simulations

My day job involves creating emergency response simulations, so I was intrigued, coming back to London yesterday after (notionally) setting fire to an oil tanker ship, to see a new ship simulation game is about to appear on the market. Ship Simulation 2006 seems to be based on technology developed for serious marine training by…

How do you know when a simulation goes wrong?

The Climate Change Simulation, which was using the processing power of thousands of peoples PCs to predict climate change, has had to re-start the whole simulation after noticing an error in its software. Makes me wonder about the accuracy of simulation programmes, and the problems of testing them. The organisers explain: “For those of you…