Coincidences and simulations: more conspiracy theory.

An article in Global Research perpetuates the story that anti-terrorism exercises anticipated the 7 July London bombings (like the 9/11 attacks, etc etc.) Peter Power, the consultant who inadvertently started the rumour during a BBC interview, has received an extraordinary number of messages about it. What I hadnt realised, though, is that Powers exercise was…

That US oil shock simulation again…

A recent simulation of an oil price shock is being quoted internationally, showing the value of simulations for opinion formers. An earlier posting on this blog referred to a simulation of the effects of a major oil price shock, conducted by the US National Commission on Energy Policy and “Securing Americas Future”. I expressed some…

Code Zoo: open source simulation packages

OReillys Code Zoo project has a page of open-source software for simulation. Code Zoo is a directory of re-usable open source components for programmers. At the moment most of the code on simulation seems to be in Java. One example is The Aglets Software Development Kit (ASDK), “a framework and environment for researching and developing…

Serus: a case study

According to Information Week, Serus has just raised $5.3m in a second round of financing. An interesting company in several ways. Firstly, it is based in California and Bangalore, and was founded by Indu Navar and Barbara Hoefle, with backgrounds in India and the US respectively. It describes itself in its press releases as “an…

Cheaper: more available: better.

An article in “DC Velocity” (“Logistics Solutions for Distribution Centre Management”) recounts the usual corporate press release stuff about how someone used a simulation package. It also makes important general points: simulation is getting cheaper, better and therefore applicable to more situations. The bottlenecks are people: attitudes and training. Where once simulations were restricted by…

Balancing the Japanese budget (virtually)

Interesting article in Gamasutra reports that the Japanese Ministry of Finance has produced a free game allowing players to try to balance the Japanese budget. The game is called “Zaimudaijin Ninatte Yosan o Tsukurou! Yosan Sakusei Game, or “Let’s Become the Minister of Finance, and Balance the Budget! The Budget Drafting Game”. Alas it doesnt…